Fashion

“Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.”

– Coco Chanel

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Fashion

The next culture

“The next culture will be a culture of “stewardship,” the energy driving it will be renewables, and the art it produces will be quite different from the art favored by production and consumption cultures.

What are the implications for the way we view both ourselves and the way we live? In brief: in the coal energy culture — a culture of workers and production — you are your job. “I am what I make.” In an oil and gas energy culture — a culture of consumption — you are your possessions. “I am what I buy.” But in a renewable energy culture, you are what you conserve. “I am what I save and protect.”

– Margaret Atwood on Medium: It’s Not Climate Change – It’s Everything Change

The next culture

Ideology

Ideology: Pisces

A highlight of this year’s New Designers: Part One, the edition of the graduate show that centres on craft and textile practices, was Katie Alderson‘s Ideology. This materials-led project translates the characteristics of each sign of the zodiac into visual and tactile properties. The coloured glass reflects the sign’s status as fire, air, earth or water, and the details on top portray the nuances of the sign. Continue reading “Ideology”

Ideology

Arts writing

“Where does this new coverage universe leave arts reporters? For me, it means working vastly differently than how I did when I started as a town reporter at a weekly newspaper in 1993. I pump out tweets and blog entries as well as 2,000-word print and online profiles. I go on camera for video pieces. I contribute graphic ideas that can be pitched to our Facebook page. And I never forget that I’m lucky to be doing this.

Arts writing – any writing – is not riveting on a car assembly line. It is getting to examine the most dynamic, adventurous, ambitious, and (sometimes) crazy people in the world.”

– Geoff Edgers, Speculations on Digital Arts Media’s Future(s)

Arts writing

“It could all get very interesting or all go horribly wrong”

“Everyone’s been talking about flavours of IoT for many, many years… “Interesting” applications may be entirely beside the point. “Interesting” stuff tends not to be fully baked, has too many options, breaks easily. Maybe IoT should have been rebranded Boring Internet from the start.”

“In some ways, the dystopian version is already here with IoT. People can’t turn their fucking house lights on. The clocks think they’re in the next time zone over. The thermostat has 404’d and the doorlock system’s getting too many hits so you can’t get inside your networked house that’s gone insane anyway.”

– Warren Ellis in conversation at www.imperica.com

“It could all get very interesting or all go horribly wrong”

Ice Watch: living through time

“Interestingly, when I did The Weather Project at Tate Modern back in 2003, climate change wasn’t on anyone’s agenda. At the time, the work was received as being about the museum as a stage, about sociality, embodiment, being singular plural. Only later did people start thinking about it in relation to the climate – and I think that’s just fine. The work is open to this shift in attention. It welcomes it. Even when I did Your Waste of Time in 2006, which anticipated Ice Watch in some respects, climate change wasn’t really on the global agenda. It was also not what drove me to bring chunks of hundreds-of-years-old Icelandic ice into an art gallery for visitors to touch them. The focus then was on direct, visceral experience – which has long been central to my art practice.

From this, I realized that encountering old ice may have extraordinary effects, and in 2014 I did Ice Watch in city hall square in Copenhagen with Minik Rosing, a geologist and great friend. When you touch an old block of melting Greenlandic inland ice, you physically feel the reality of time passing and climate change in a way different to reading the newspaper or through numbers and scientific data. This is where the arts speak a strong, direct language. In two minutes, Ice Watch can communicate more than can be said in 700 pages of a scientific report.”

– Olafur Eliasson interviewed by designboom

Ice Watch: living through time